Tag Archives: women power

The Duchess, by Danielle Steel, 2017

Title: The Duchess

Author: Danielle Steel

Publisher: Pan Macmillan India

Genre: Historical Fiction

Format: Paperback

Language: English

No. of pages: 336

Synopsis:

T he incomparable Danielle Steel breaks new ground as she takes us to nineteenth-century England, where a high-born young woman is forced out into the world–and begins a journey of survival, sensuality, and long-sought justice.

Angelique Latham has grown up at magnificent Belgrave Castle under the loving tutelage of her father, the Duke of Westerfield, after the death of her aristocratic French mother. At eighteen she is her father’s closest, most trusted child, schooled in managing their grand estate. But when he dies, her half-brothers brutally turn her out, denying her very existence. Angelique has a keen mind, remarkable beauty, and an envelope of money her father pressed upon her. To survive, she will need all her resources–and one bold stroke of fortune.

Unable to secure employment without references or connections, Angelique desperately makes her way to Paris, where she rescues a young woman fleeing an abusive madam–and suddenly sees a possibility: Open an elegant house of pleasure that will protect its women and serve only the best clients. With her upper-class breeding, her impeccable style, and her father’s bequest, Angelique creates Le Boudoir, soon a sensational establishment where powerful men, secret desires, and beautiful, sophisticated women come together. But living on the edge of scandal, can she ever make a life of her own–or regain her rightful place in the world?

From England to Paris to New York, Danielle Steel captures an age of upheaval and the struggles of women in a male-ruled society–and paints a captivating portrait of a woman of unquenchable spirit, who in houses great or humble is every ounce a duchess. (less)

My review:

I received a review copy from the publishers in return for an honest review. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own. I read this book for the #lostandfoundreadathon hosted by @PanMacmillanIndia .

The Duchess is one of the best Danielle Steel books I have ever read. Historical fiction is one of my favourite genres, apart from women-centric fiction. The Duchess is an amazing combination of both and it kept me hooked in until the very end.

The Duchess is almost a chronicle of the life and times of Angelique, a wonderful woman who is displaced because of dire situations, namely the death of a father, with cruel brothers left behind. Her journey, as such, is made more profound because of this injustice done to her by the people meant to love and support her – her family (brother to be specific). It also sheds light on how vicious jealousy can be – her circumstances become such simply because her elder stepbrother is jealous of the love Angelique and her mother got from their father.

The character arc of Angelique is tremendous. From a meek and nice girl, she transforms into a force of nature, a force to be reckoned with. The makeover part, as she literally starts her new venture is France especially, is one that I loved. This book also shows that there is no pure white and black to things – life is often filled with shades of the colour in-between them.

Her journey is also beautiful. Although it is filled with ups and downs, it is a beautiful portrayal of a life full of adventure and daring. I was ensnared by Angelique and her grit and determination. I absolutely loved reading this book and will probably pick this one up again very soon!

Verdict:

I rate this read 4.5/5 stars!

About the reviewer:

Nayanika Saikia, is one of the foremost book reviewers from the North-east and Assam, and is also an admin for the official India bookstagram page on Instagram. She publishes her own reviews and recommendations for poetry, fiction, non-fiction etc. on her bookstagram account @pretty_little_bibliophile which won the NorthEast Creator Awards 2018, as well as in daily newspapers, online magazines etc.  She can be contacted at nayanikasaikia98@gmail.com .

The Good Fight, by Danielle Steel, 2018

Title: The Good Fight

Author: Danielle Steel

Publisher: Pan Macmillan

Genre: General Literature/ Women Fiction

Format: Paperback

Language: English

No. of pages: 287

Synopsis:

Against the electrifying backdrop of the 1960s, Danielle Steel unveils the gripping chronicle of a young woman discovering a passion for justice and of the unsung heroes she encounters on her quest to fight the good fight.

The daughter and granddaughter of prominent Manhattan lawyers, Meredith McKenzie is destined for the best of everything: top schools, elite social circles, the perfect marriage. Spending her childhood in Germany as her father prosecutes Nazi war criminals at the Nuremberg trials, Meredith soaks up the conflict between good and evil as it plays out in real time. When her family returns to the United States, she begins blazing her own trail, swimming against the tides, spurred on by her freethinking liberal grandfather, determined to become a lawyer despite her traditional, conservative father’s objections. She rebels against her parents’ expectations for her debutante ball and other conventions. She forges a lifelong friendship with a young German Jewish woman whose family died in the concentration camps. And while her grandfather rises to the Supreme Court, Meredith enlists in the most pressing causes of her time, fighting for civil rights and an end to the Vietnam War.

From the bright morning of JFK’s inauguration, through the tumultuous years that follow as America hurtles toward the twin assassinations of Martin Luther King and Bobby Kennedy, Meredith joins the vanguard of a new generation of women, breaking boundaries socially, politically, and professionally. But when the violence of the era strikes too close to home, her once tightly knit family must survive a devastating loss and rethink their own values and traditions in light of the times.

Encompassing the remarkable people Meredith meets, the historic events she witnesses, and the sacrifices she must make, this is the story of a woman changing her world as she herself is changed by it. Beautifully told, brimming with unforgettable moments and characters, The Good Fight is an inspiring, uplifting novel with resonance for our own time.

My review:

I received a review copy from the publishers in return for an honest review. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own. I read this book for the #lostandfoundreadathon hosted by @PanMacmillanIndia .

Let’s talk about what an awesome woman Meredith is! She is determined, passionate, and not afraid to go after what she wants. Danielle Steel has again succeeded in providing us with an admirable young woman as a role model.

What is very important are the issues that we see mentioned in this book. Steel has picked up some very harrowing events in the history of humankind and it is not easy to read about them. The supporting female character of Claudia is a wonderful woman herself – she has been through so much and yet, remains resilient. It really shows how human nature can survive the worst of times and still stand strong and move on. It is poignant and her story is so raw and real.

It also shows how difficult it is for us when a close family member is not willing to let us do what we think is right. Meredith’s father, is one such person, who would rather she graduate and get married. His views are very limited and surprisingly so, considering his work during the Nuremberg trials, and it is too late for change for him. The family tragedy is sad for the reader even and I was affected.

I loved Meredith’s grandfather for being so supportive and encouraging, and being so modern and open-minded in his outlook. He played a very important role in helping Meredith turn out to be the woman she did. I truly admire him.

However, I did find the book repetitive at times and unfortunately, did not enjoy this book as much as I did The Right Time. This book did have many emotions involved and that was a redeeming point. It is also not a very common plotline that Steel generally takes up, I think. Nonetheless, this was a good read overall, but could have been better.

Verdict:

I rated this book 3.5/5 stars. If you love reading bildungsroman with a political bend, this might be the one for you.

About the reviewer:

Nayanika Saikia, is one of the foremost book reviewers from the North-east and Assam, and is also an admin for the official India bookstagram page on Instagram. She publishes her own reviews and recommendations for poetry, fiction, non-fiction etc. on her bookstagram account @pretty_little_bibliophile which won the NorthEast Creator Awards 2018, as well as in daily newspapers, online magazines etc.  She can be contacted at nayanikasaikia98@gmail.com .

My Danielle Steel COllection!

So I have told you all multiple times about how i inherited quite a few books from my mother’s side of the family. Among them were various editions of Danielle Steel. Now, I was very young back then and so my Mom would not let me read Steel. But now, after I appeared for my 10 Finals, I was basically given free reign to read whatever I wanted.

So here are the few Danielle Steel books I own today (1 to 6 are old old editions):

  1. Season of Passion, 1979
  2. A Perfect Stranger, 1982
  3. The Gift, 1994
  4. Special Delivery, 1997 (This book was tagged at just 60INR!)
  5. The Klone and I, 1998 ( This book was tagged at just 50INR!)
  6. Bittersweet, 1999
  7. Dangerous Games, 2017
  8. The Duchess, 2017
  9. The Right Time, 2017
  10. The Good Fight, 2018
  11. Lost and Found, 2019

So I have been reading the last 5 above mentioned books for the #lostandfoundreadathon and I have been loving it. Steel has a way of writing that just touches your heart and makes you relate so easily!

Have you read any of these? Do you enjoy reading Danielle Steel books as well?

The Women who Ruled India: Leaders. Warriors. Icons. by Archana Garodia Gupta, 2019

Title: The Women Who Ruled India: Leaders. Warriors. Icons.

Author: Archana Garodia Gupta

Publisher: Hachette India

Genre: Historical

Format: Paperback

Language: English

No. of pages: 299

Synopsis:

The history of India, more often than not, is a history of the men who were in charge. Largely forgotten are the women who, even centuries earlier, shaped the fates of entire kingdoms.

In The Women Who Ruled India, writer and researcher Archana Garodia Gupta revives 20 such powerful figures from the archives, offering us a glimpse of their fascinating lives. Among them are Begum Samru, a courtesan who went on to become the head of a mercenary army and the ruler of Sardhana; Didda of Kashmir, known for her keen political instinct and a ruthlessness that spared no one; Rani Abbakka of Ullal, the fearless queen who took on Portuguese colonizers in their heyday; and Rani Mangammal of Madurai, the famed administrator who built alliances at a time when going to war was the order of the day.

These women and others like them built roads, instituted laws and were generous patrons of the arts and sciences. Their stories of valour and diplomacy, leadership and wit continue to inspire today. Peppered with anecdotes that showcase little-known facets of their personalities, the accounts in this book celebrate heroic rulers who – ‘quarrelsome’ though they might have been – were iconoclasts: unafraid to forge new paths.

My review:

I received a review copy from the publishers in return for an honest review. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.

The Women who Ruled India was a really inspiring read. I personally think that this is a great book to gift to the young women as well as men, in our lives. Reading this book at an impressionable age with be a great benefit.

The women here are brave and just, and that is a great lesson. It teaches us to understand that being brave and courageous does not necessarily mean that we do not fear anything, rather we overcome the fear. This book also shows so many instances when these wonderful, beautiful women always put their people and their subjects above their own lives. Being so selfless is another quality that is worth mentioning.

The manner that this book is written in – inclusion of the history first as an introduction, the woman’s general life span history and a short story or instance at the end. This makes sure that you are not bored as you move through the amazing stories of such inspiring women.

The language used is standard without being too complex so I think that it will be understandable for pretty much everyone.

Verdict:

I am rating this book a solid 4/5 for its amazing inspiring factor.

About the reviewer:

Nayanika Saikia, is one of the foremost book reviewers from the North-east and Assam, and is also an admin for the official India bookstagram page on Instagram. She publishes her own reviews and recommendations for poetry, fiction, non-fiction etc. on her bookstagram account @pretty_little_bibliophile which won the NorthEast Creator Awards 2018, as well as in daily newspapers, online magazines etc.  She can be contacted at nayanikasaikia98@gmail.com .