Tag Archives: spiritual

The King of the Sea: A review

The King of the Sea
The King of the Sea

The King of the Sea was a very reflective read which often made me introspect and just stop and think of what the author has written. The writing is fu of musical cadences that are really soothing to the mind. There is a healthy union of poetry and spiritual tidbits that made a composite whole that I as a reader really liked.

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Thought-provoking and novel, this book was quite different from most other works. Separate from the conventional manner of narration, this particular work of the author is all-encompassing both in regards to the story as well as the reader in his reading environment.

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What might pose a difficulty for most people is, I believe, the manner in which the characters speak. Keeping in mind that this is very much a metaphysical novel, the reader finds a lot of tangential and metaphorical phrases.

Towards the middle, I did think that it felt dragged but powering through those few pages, I once again reached the valley of introspection to read the book in.

The cover and title of the book is apt and I simply love how aesthetic this photo came out as! I definitely recommend this one to you all.

⭐⭐⭐⭐/5 stars!

Ambrosia Sides, by Abhijita Kulshrestha, 2019

Title: Ambrosia Sides

Author: Abhijita Kulshrestha

Publisher: Shakti Books, an imprint of Har-Anand Publications Pvt Ltd

Genre: Poetry

Format: Paperback

Language: English

No. of pages: 120

My review:

I received a review copy from the author in return for an honest review. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.

Ambrosia Sides was an enjoyable poetry read and I absolutely enjoyed it. There is a very strong spiritual undercurrent to it and I think that is why many of the poems touch your souls.

The poet conveys through her poems various important themes and it reflects on us as well. She talks about fate, of what it means to be a woman, the treatment of women at the hands of men, gender oppression eve teasing, the concepts of consent/rape, of looking away from it, as well as the power of faith, healing, the will to live, or the utter lack of it, journeys – both mental and emotional, sisterhood etc.

Some of my favourite poems in the collection are – QUEST, A WISP, OUTLAWS, ALLURE, MONSOONS, SNAP, TIDES, THE WAIT, RIOT, BALM, CLOSURE, HEARTBREAK, VAGABOND, MIND BENDER, MYSTERY and THREAT. From the names of the poems itself, it is clear that the author has written about a variety of emotions that we as humans go through every day. The issue of identity also plays an important role in our lives and this crisis is seen in the poems.

There is a spiritual note to the poems, and magical strands of lyricism entwine the collection. The power of memories, waiting/expectations, desire, depression, awareness/presence etc. are some of the other issues that can be seen in the poems.

Apart from the poems, I also loved the book cover; it is so simple yet so elegant!

Verdict:

Ambrosia Sides was an enjoyable read and I rated it a 4/5 stars!

About the reviewer:

Nayanika Saikia, is one of the foremost book reviewers from the North-east and Assam, and is also an admin for the official India bookstagram page on Instagram. She publishes her own reviews and recommendations for poetry, fiction, non-fiction etc. on her bookstagram account @pretty_little_bibliophile which won the NorthEast Creator Awards 2018, as well as in daily newspapers, online magazines etc.  She can be contacted at nayanikasaikia98@gmail.com .

The Blue Moon Day, Santhosh Sivaraj, 2017

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Publishers: Invincible Publishers
Genre: Short Story collection
Synopsis:
Things were never the same for five ordinary individuals who got struck at cross roads and there was no way they can run back. They had no other choice but to take a plunge into their deepest fear and leave the rest to destiny. Their characters was tested out of their comfort zone and it witnessed abstruse results; a PhD scholar fights to win a pizza making contest and a tennis prodigy running for his life in a war torn, bloodied Island. Extreme circumstances and their consequences made these ordinary individuals extraordinary . Was the test imposed on them by someone? Or did they invite it on themselves. The Blue Moon Day is that Once in a Blue Moon day story which questions an individual’s priorities, ridicules the worldly routines and finally redefines happiness.
My Review:
This book is basically a collection of 6 interrelated short stories and like many other reviewers have said before, it has been wonderfully executed. Considering the fact that it is the author’s debut novel, it is par excellence.
There are different plots in all these stories, exploring various aspects of human life. They are all very true and relatable- and makes one introspect at times. Other than that simple fact, there is the entertainment factor too, which the book fulfils very well. The characters are so real and almost tangible. As one reads, it feels as if one is truly living the experience. In short, I loved the character arcs.
The writing style is above average- it is not something very simple, but nonetheless, it is really good. The epistolary form – with the letters are always very revealing and adds the emotion to the work. And the mystery element makes you turn one page after another. The cover is beautiful and very much related to the stories in an abstract/metaphorical way. Despite the fact that it is purely fiction, in one way or another it is a self-help/motivational book for everyone. It teaches through the help of examples. However, at times there were excessive exclamation marks or the use of symbols to write profanities, which I think was absolutely unnecessary. The language was too simple at some points though.
This book really inspires and gives hope to the reader that it is never too late to turn your life around- you just have to find it in you to do so.

Verdict:
I rate this book a 4/5 stars and recommend it to those looking for a short but meaningful read.

Spirits in a Spice Jar, Sarina Kamini, 2018

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Publishers: Westland Publications
Genre: Non-fiction
Synopsis:
For Sarina Kamini’s Kashmiri family, food is love, love is faith, and faith is family. It’s cause for total emotional devastation when, ten years after her Australian mother is diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease, unaddressed grief turns the spice of this young food writer’s heritage to ash and her prayers to poison. At her lowest ebb, Sarina’s dead Ammi’s typed-up cooking notes become a recipe for healing, her progress in the kitchen marked by her movement through bitterness, grief and loneliness—the daal that is too fiery and lumpen; her play with salt that pricks and burns. In teaching herself how to personalize tradition and spirituality through spice, Sarina creates space to reconsider her relationship with Hinduism and God in a way that allows room for questions. She learns forgiveness of herself for being different and comes to accept that family means change and challenge as much as acceptance and love.
My Review:
Spirits in a Spice Jar is a story of personal growth and understanding- that of the author mostly, but also of myself as a reader. Noted as a non-fiction, this book also dabbles in the various genres of autobiography, epistolary, a cookbook, and philosophy/spiritual. It has been an enriching read, that certainly must not be missed by those seeking the meaning of their lives.
We follow the author as she explores her rich heritage, almost a decade after her mother has been diagnosed by the Parkinson’s disease. Food serves as a medium to help her come to terms with her grief and denial, as she tries to understand herself by cooking through a set of recipes her Ammi had used. It is a spiritual journey for her as she comes to terms with who she is as a person in herself, as a wife, a mother and a daughter, and accepting and loving that; her experience in discovering her own faith is also awe-inspiring. The mother-daughter dynamic is also realistically portrayed here and I applaud the author’s bravery in doing so- baring her deepest feelings. There is this magnificent web of emotions juxtaposing the author’s role as a daughter/child for her parents and as a mother for her own children.
The naming of the chapters was also an interesting thing- for food marks milestones in our lives; so much so that it would be sad to disregard their importance in our lives- even those of the smallest of cardamom pods. As the blurb of the book says, “food is love, love is faith, and faith is family”; food is cathartic, while cooking can be an anti-depressant for so many revelers. The book also covers the social impact of what the exodus of her ancestors, who were Kashmiri Pandits, did to the later generations. The language used is comparatively easy and understandable, often recessing into philosophical meditations by the author. When it comes to the book cover, I feel that they are very essential as they convey the depth of the story and also attract the readers. Spirits in a Spice Jar has a beautiful rustic themed cover, that resonates with the Indian in me, personally. Artfully placed bay leaves, peppercorns, and star anises almost produce a mirage of an almost tangible fragrance for me. It is a soul-stirring.
However, I do think that adding more family scenes would have been preferable- especially those of the author’s life as a small child living with her two brother and happy parents- of the happy times, basically.
Verdict:
I had a heartwarming, heart-stopping time reading this book. There was an instance of a full-on sob fest as I made my way through it. Not a book I will be forgetting anytime soon, for sure, I rate Spirits in a Spice Jar a 5/5 stars.