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Mythological Fiction: Raavanputr Meghnad

Raavanputr Meghnad by Kevil Missal is a new mythological fiction that follows the lesser-known Meghnad, Raavan’s favourite son, who fought on Ram’s side!

Ravanputr Meghnad
Ravanputr Meghnad

Mythological Fiction in Raavanputr Meghnad

Towards the beginning of this month, I had picked up Vyasa, a graphic novel on the Mahabharata. As such, it was only fitting that I also read a fictional twist on the Ramayana as well. Ravanputr Meghnad by Kevin Missal is based on the Ramayana, more specifically, Raavan’s favourite son Meghnad. However, the storyline is not true to the actual Ramayana and has been fictionalized, so do keep that in mind before picking up the book.

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Raavanputr Meghnad versus the Ramayana

The plot was an interesting one and it helped me to imagine another way in which the story may have happened. I quite enjoyed the path it took especially in regards to the development of Meghnad’s character. The change, which occurs especially after his meeting the love of his life, a Naga princess, was quite fast towards the middle. It is at this point that he realizes that his ways may not have been entirely right.

Narrative style

Changing narratives also kept the plot interesting and I liked getting glimpses into the actions, and thus, the minds of the various characters such as Meghnad, Prameela, Suparnika, and Laxman.

What I did not like about this mythological fiction

However, since it was inspired by actual mythology, the setting has been the same. As such, I think it was a strike against the book that the characters used modern slangs, which seemed out of time for the characters. Moreover, the author tried to bring in comedic elements through the familial bonds, which I do not think worked very well.

Verdict:

Overall, it was an enjoyable and quick read. I was absorbed while reading it and did like the overall arch. If you like mythological stories written with a twist, this is definitely one you should pick up soon. I rated it 3.75/5 stars.

Check out similar books: Upon a Burning Throne books 1 and 2; Narasimha; Greek Mythology; The Secret of Palamu Fort; Ashwatthama’s Redemption; Kaalkoot, etc.

Sita: Warrior of Mithila, Amish Tripathi, 2017


I loved Scion of Ikshvaku so much that immediately after finishing it, I picked up Sita. It was a good enough read, but I do prefer the first book over this. I gave this book a 4/5 stars.
This book, like most of you already know, covers Sita’s journey and it converges with Book 1 at the swayamvar for which Ram is deceptively brought to Mithila by the cunning Vishwamitra. This book also clears a few doubts we may have had regarding the mysterious characters we were introduced to in the previous one.
Sita is an indomitable character and a round one at that. Her raging temper is something that is perhaps never seen in young princesses, or girls belonging to the nobility, whether adopted or biological. This fact in itself lends a certain originality to her character; she is more real than any prim and proper princess- she has a fighting spirit. She is beautiful and brave and the Prime Minister of Mithila! She is intelligent, pragmatic and tactful, and we see how wonderfully she complements Ram. (Fun fact: Sita is older than Ram by 5 years in this book. It must be noted that I have no idea whether it is so, in the epic itself, or not).
There are other characters as well like Samichi who is Sita’s right-hand woman and also the Police and Protocol Chief. She is a strong character in herself- a formidable one at that and that fact that she was from the slums meant everybody respected the hard work she had put in to reach the high post she was in. We also see Queen Sunaina, Sita’s adopted mother and King Janak’s wife. She too is a bold and kind character and it is from her that Sita inherited her burning fighting spirit.
However, the fact that stopped me from giving it a solid 5/5 stars, unlike its predecessor was that it simply felt repetitive in so many parts. I know that it is inevitable since the events in the book are taking place simultaneously with that of Book 1. However, it was a thing I did not like. The story was good overall, the characters enthralling and the plot ensnaring, however structure that the author adopted to write this story is not something I am a fan of.
I am looking forward to the third book in the series i.e. Ravan, which will converge with the other two, mainly with Sita’s kidnapping, apart from possibly the battle at Karachapa, and Sita’s swayamvar.