Tag Archives: psychological thriller

A smashing collection: What the Eyes See

What the Eyes See is a smashing short story collection of 7 short stories; namely Sira, The Game, The Dreamcatcher, 1978, What the Eyes See, Karma, and The Angel Numbers.

What the eyes see
What the eyes see

Synopsis of this smashing collection:

How much of what you see can you believe?
How much can you trust yourself and the people around you?
Some time into the future, a 60-year-old man is suspicious about the Artificial Intelligence he has procured for his home.
Back in the ’70s, a man visiting his hometown for vacation has the most terrifying experience of his life.
In Delhi, a young woman gets a beautiful gift, which she later realizes might not be so beautiful after all.
In Dubai, a young entrepreneur realizes that giving a lift to strangers might lead to horrifying consequences.
These and many more… What the Eyes See is a collection of dark stories to take with you into the night.

A smashing anthology!

What the Eyes See is a collection of 7 short stories; namely Sira, The Game, The Dreamcatcher, 1978, What the Eyes Se, Karma, and The Angel Numbers.

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These stories all have unexpected twists that will totally take the reader by surprise; I know I certainly was! I love that although the stories are linear in a way, they have a certain element that while disrupts the flow, only makes the reading experience better. A strong point in all of these short stories is the climaxes that are strong and powerful. I love the way they punch through the narrative.

Themes, and styles

 The writing style is great and fluid and intertwined with the wonderful imaginative powers, this collection provides a strong suit. A good mixture of suspense and horror, the stories also cover the themes of artificial intelligence, and the effect it can have on humanity, mortality, dystopia, magic, revenge, illusions, family, etc. the concepts of the plots for the different stories are really unique and has a wide range although, at the end, there is a common thread of horror/mystery running throughout.

Verdict:

The cover is also well made and really reflects the atmospheric nature of this collection. I quite enjoyed this book and I rate it 4/5 stars.

Another Thriller: You Beneath Your Skin

You Beneath Your Skin is an enjoyable thriller set in India and as a thriller, it sheds light on the rape culture, acid attacks, etc.

You Beneath Your Skin by Damyanti Biswas
You Beneath Your Skin by Damyanti Biswas

Why pick up this thriller:

With a thrilling premise, You Beneath Your Skin proved to be an important read. So if you wish to start with crime fiction, this might just be the one for you.

A slow beginning:

 The book started slow but did pick up the pace pretty soon. So I think that if you can just power through the first few pages, it will prove to be a pretty interesting read.

Plot and themes:

The plot was well developed and the book delves into important aspects of the female population, more specifically, the various things women have to face. Rape and acid attacks are horrible issues that are plaguing society today and the author has included this in the book. For me, it was bittersweet as reading about the suffering is never wholesome, but it is also necessary at the same time that we understand that this is a reality and acknowledge its presence and the injustice. Brushing it aside it a gross insult to survivors and through the book, the author has tried to address this situation.

Writing style and title:

With a crisp writing style, the plot is full of unexpected twists and turns and you just cannot put it down. Once a person delves into the read, the reader will understand how significant and meaningful the title is. Politics and the power that the higher-ups wield, and how they use it, also forms the backdrop of the political situation in the book.

Verdict:

It was an overall good read. I rate it 3.75/5 stars.

Links:

  1. Amazon: https://www.amazon.in/BENEATH-YOUR-SKIN-DAMYANTI-BISWAS/dp/9386797623/ref=sr_1_1?qid=1574174641&refinements=p_27%3ADAMYANTI+BISWAS&s=books&sr=1-1
  2. Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48080944-you-beneath-your-skin

Similar reads:

  1. The Silent Patient
  2. The Millenium Trilogy
  3. The Third Mrs. Durst
  4. Impossible Causes

The Silent Patient, by Alex Michaelides, 2019

Title: The Silent Patient

Author: Alex Michaelides

Publisher: Orion Books, Hachette

Genre: Thriller

Format: Paperback

Language: English

No. of pages: 339

Recommended for: All domestic thriller fans

Synopsis:

Alicia Berenson’s life is seemingly perfect. A famous painter married to an in-demand fashion photographer, she lives in a grand house with big windows overlooking a park in one of London’s most desirable areas. One evening her husband Gabriel returns home late from a fashion shoot, and Alicia shoots him five times in the face, and then never speaks another word.

Alicia’s refusal to talk, or give any kind of explanation, turns a domestic tragedy into something far grander, a mystery that captures the public imagination and casts Alicia into notoriety. The price of her art skyrockets, and she, the silent patient, is hidden away from the tabloids and spotlight at the Grove, a secure forensic unit in North London.

Theo Faber is a criminal psychotherapist who has waited a long time for the opportunity to work with Alicia. His determination to get her to talk and unravel the mystery of why she shot her husband takes him down a twisting path into his own motivations—a search for the truth that threatens to consume him….

My review:

I received a review copy from the publishers in return for an honest review. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.

The Silent Patient had been in my TBR for a really long time. I had loved the premise and being a fan of domestic thrillers, this one topped my wishlist. As such, I was so grateful when Hachette wanted to send a copy my way! I ended up picking this book for the Reading Rush Challenge 2019, where I read it for the prompt – Read an author’s first book. It was a great decision by the way and I thoroughly enjoyed reading it. I finished it in under 24 hours (I forgot to clock my time) and then, recently, my mother also picked it up. I waited this long for the review, because I also wanted to include my mother’s perspective on the book.

In this book the author is talking about this enigmatic woman (atleast Theo Faber considers her enigmatic) who has allegedly killed her husband and gone silent. ‘Allegedly’ is a term I use loosely. There are some people who are convinced of her doings and there are still some left who believed that she is indeed innocent. I love the manner in which this book is written – it is very matter-of-fact I believe, and so you are bound to feel as if it is happening to real people you know. The addition of the personal drama in the lives of both the people, especially of the narrator Theo Faber, is a great touch as it gives a certain depth to the story.

This book is truly a page turner. As a reader, you are bound to just keep on reading and keep turning the pages on and on. Moreover, this is a really different type of a domestic thriller, I think. Because in most other books of this genre, we have an unreliable narrator, however, that is entirely not the case in this book. The narrator is Theo Faber, a forensic psychotherapist as opposed to some deranged wife, who is unreliable because of her mental health, or alcohol problems etc.

The themes of emotional trauma – both in their childhood as well as adult life is rife throughout. The human psyche is depicted wonderfully through a myriad of various characters.


The only problem I and my mother had, was that the time frame was not very clear to us. We thought that the way the two storylines (I am so not revealing anything! You need to pick up this book ASAP!) We carried out, was not enough to clear the doubts regarding the time frame surrounding the actions. We could not decipher the events from the time frame provided – whether they are happening simultaneously (which we felt was happening) or in the past or future.

However, we did enjoy the book and that twist was not really expected! I did hint at something like that but nonetheless, that twist had me close the book and sit for a while, shocked and wondering how the hell I did not see that coming.

Verdict:

We really enjoyed this book and rate this one a 4.5/5 stars!

About the author:

Born in Cyprus to a Greek-Cypriot father and English mother, I studied English literature at Cambridge University and got my MA in screenwriting at the American Film Institute in Los Angeles. I wrote the film The Devil You Know (2013) starring Rosamund Pike and co-wrote The Con is On (2018), starring Uma Thurman, Tim Roth, Parker Posey and Sofia Vergara. THE SILENT PATIENT is my first novel.

About the reviewer:

Nayanika Saikia, is one of the foremost book reviewers from the North-east and Assam, and is also an admin for the official India bookstagram page on Instagram. She publishes her own reviews and recommendations for poetry, fiction, non-fiction etc. on her bookstagram account @pretty_little_bibliophile which won the NorthEast Creator Awards 2018, as well as in daily newspapers, online magazines etc.  She can be contacted at nayanikasaikia98@gmail.com .

Fireside Chat with a Grammar Nazi Serial Killer, by Ryan Suvaal, 2019

Title: Fireside Chat with a Grammar Nazi Serial Killer

Author: Ryan Suvaal

Publisher: Self-published

Genre: Thriller/Psychological/novella

Format: E-Book

Language: English

No. of pages: 23

Recommended for: All psychological thriller buffs can go for this short novella.

Synopsis:

Seventeen gruesome killings across the United States, within a span of six months and there is one clear connection among victims. They were all writers. 
While media is decorating the murders with sensationalist stories, and law enforcement is playing catch-up, the homicidal maniac remains elusive and secretive. 
Things get very interesting, when one day she decides to appear on an internet talk show for an honest fireside chat. 

My review:

For such a short psychological thriller, this book was surely a page-turner. Despite its short length it is amazingly fantastic.

The idea that the author has taken up, is in itself very intriguing – for a person to turn a killer because of reading book which lacks the proper grammar! This idea itself of a ‘Grammar Nazi’ being a serial killer is enough to make you take a second look at the book.

What is also great is that this book seems like an aftermath of the killings, when the killer reveals what she does and why she does it. In this way, she too reveals information of the host of the show – which mind you, no one has been able to do so. In one way you cannot help but admire the acumen of this infamous lady killer. She is precise and definitely knows what she is doing – she knows her abilities and uses them to the full of her capability. The author has really carved out a character who seems very real – almost ass if she is one among us. The book reads smoothly as well. It genuinely feels like you’re listening to this show and not merely reading this in a book.


The pacing was kept on-point and the author has done a great job with this seemingly short read. The research shows through. The subtle imagery was also on point! With an amazing surprise at the end, this book comes like a punch, one that you can completely read through easily, under an hour. And a shout out to the author for the blatant message – readers absolutely do not enjoy reading books which have a ton of grammatical errors!

Verdict:

I really enjoyed reading this book and I rate it a 4/5 stars. Definitely recommend it to all crime buffs!

About the author:

Ryan Suvaal is passionate about writing page-turner psychological thrillers. His favorite hangout is a coffee shop where he guzzles in tonnes of caffeine and weaves characters pumped up with deadly intentions and worlds full of thrill, suspense, and gore.
“Fireside Chat with a Grammar Nazi Serial Killer” is one of the first in a series of Psychological thrillers which he has penned down during past few months, which will now be sequentially released on Amazon.

“A deep-rooted question always keeps broiling inside of me. This question is whether I am writing the story or the story is forcing me to write it? Am I the actor and story is the art, or story is the actor and I am the medium?”

About the reviewer:

Nayanika Saikia, is one of the foremost book reviewers from the North-east and Assam, and is also an admin for the official India bookstagram page on Instagram. She publishes her own reviews and recommendations for poetry, fiction, non-fiction etc. on her bookstagram account @pretty_little_bibliophile which won the NorthEast Creator Awards 2018, as well as in daily newspapers, online magazines etc.  She can be contacted at nayanikasaikia98@gmail.com .

The Woman in the Window, A. J. Finn, 2018

IMG-20180718-WA0021.jpg
Publishers: HarperCollins Publishers
Synopsis:
What did she see?
It’s been ten long months since Anna Fox last left her home. Ten months during which she has haunted the rooms of her old New York house like a ghost, lost in her memories, too terrified to step outside.
Anna’s lifeline to the real world is her window, where she sits day after day, watching her neighbours. When the Russells move in, Anna is instantly drawn to them. A picture-perfect family of three, they are an echo of the life that was once hers.
But one evening, a frenzied scream rips across the silence and Anna witnesses something no one was supposed to see. Now she must do everything she can to uncover the truth about what really happened. But even if she does, will anyone believe her? And can she even trust herself?
My review:
The protagonist is almost like an anti-heroine and that’s the one thing that really attracted me- the unreliable narrator aspect is one trope that is very often used in case of women in psychological thrillers. In this novel too, I really like it. Moreover, the fact that she being a psychologist is undergoing a psychological problem herself is quite poignant- though she has been trained to help such children, she is unable to help herself. The agoraphobia theme is also something new that I have come across and in this way definitely learnt something new. Anna Fox is a really likeable character despite her many flaws. She is so realistic and relatable that you just cannot help but almost reach out to her as she despairs her situation and the believability that people have when it comes to her authenticity.
The other characters too I feel were well developed, though none as well as Anna, obviously. The whole story took quite an unexplainable turn in the end as anyone can expect in a novel as such, and yet this twist is completely twisted and not something that one could have even imagined. It’s wilder than wild horses running in your dreams.
The whole book, though seeming quite long, was actually very easy to cover- probably because of the short chapters. The reader is kept reeling as the shocks come, one after the another. However, I have to admit that I found the beginning very slow and I hardly ever favour slow-paced books. I had put down the book I admit, but somehow decided to take it up again because of the fact that I hate to DNF it.
This psychological thriller was really an interesting one for me. Having read The Girl on the Train as well as Gone Girl, I loved this opportunity to be able to read another such exciting and fun read.
Verdict:
This was a 4 star read for me undoubtedly. The one star I do not give- it’s only because of the unsatisfactory and slow paced beginning.