Tag Archives: #indiabookstagram

After the Flood, by Kassandra Montag, 2019

Title: After the Flood

Author: Kassandra Montag

Published on: 19th September, 2019

Publisher: The Borough Press

Genre: Dystopian/Fantasy

Format: Paperback

Synopsis:

The world is mostly water when Pearl is born. The floods have left America a cluster of small islands with roving trade ships and raiders.

Pearl knows little of her father Jacob and elder sister Row, who left her mother Myra when she was pregnant with her. Between them they make do, with Myra fishing and trading to make ends meet, travelling from island to island on Bird, the boat Myra’s grandfather made before he died.

Whilst their life is a tranquil one, Myra still aches for the daughter she once lost. When a chance encounter reveals that Row might still be alive, Myra packs up six-year-old Pearl and together they begin a dangerous voyage to The Valley, where rumours of violence and breeding ships run rampant.

Along the way they encounter death and strangers, finally finding solace on board Sedna – full to the brim with supplies and an able crew – where Myra feels like she might be closer to finding Row than she has ever been. But to get to Row she will have to deceive everyone around her, betraying the trust of those she’s come to love, and ask herself if she’s willing to sacrifice everything and everyone for what might be nothing at all.

My review:

I received a review copy in return for an honest review. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.

After the Flood was a very interesting read as well as scary to be honest. Scary in the sense that it deals with an issue which might eve turn real in a few years in our future. The dystopian genre is often an unsettling one because at the rate that we are going, the instances portrayed in the books seem very plausible.

After the Flood was one of my most anticipated new releases from the second half of 2019. I was pumped and the book did not disappoint. From the eco-critical point of view this book was a significant one that may well serve as a warning to the present generations. In a futuristic yet primeval world where everything has been submerged under water, Myra and Pearl are a mother-daughter duo who are doing their best to survive in the Westworld like world. Throughout the book we see them struggling with the scenario – they have to depend on fishing for their food and trade with these at ports which have not yet been submerged.

The theme of memory is quite significant here – Myra, for instance, deals with recurring ones of a time when things had been very different. Pearl is a gem and her bond with her mother is quite beautiful. For the most part, we see Myra dealing with her loss of her older daughter and then she keeps on wondering if in pursuing her, she will lose Pearl too?

The other characters were also well made – the unraveling of Abran is a significant one, especially as we see a person undoing their years of hard work because of the stress and pressure they are feeling at the moment.

The story was well-paced, the characters real and tortured in their own ways, and the world a scarily real portrait of what might be our own future one day. The language is easy to read and captivating as the reader grapples with the horrifying scenario that it has become. The adventure is nail-bitingly intriguing, and keeps you on the edge of your seat at all times!

Verdict:

 I really loved this book and it just might be the best book I have read so far in the second half of 2019! 5/5 stars!

About the reviewer:

Nayanika Saikia, is one of the foremost book reviewers from the North-east and Assam, and is also an admin for the official India bookstagram page on Instagram. She publishes her own reviews and recommendations for poetry, fiction, non-fiction etc. on her bookstagram account @pretty_little_bibliophile which won the NorthEast Creator Awards 2018, as well as in daily newspapers, online magazines etc.  She can be contacted at nayanikasaikia98@gmail.com .

WAlk With Wings, by Tene Edwards!

Hey guys! How’s it going? I have had quite a hectic week this week. We had the freshmen social on Thursday and after that it has just been very tiring. I hope to rest and recuperate on the weekend! Also,  I have got a ton of work to do…

Here’s a book that came in the mail a couple days ago. Tene Edwards was kind enough to send me her book and I am very excited to read it. I have already read a couple of pieces and I really connected with them. I hope to read some more on the weekend. Thanks a lot for the book!

Walk With Wings by Tene Edwards is a poetry collection split into five chapters: Monsoon Love, Winter Sorrow, Autumn Grace, Spring Resilient, and Summer Freedom. In short, poignant verses, Tene’s poems are a compilation of reflections on her experiences, thoughts, and feelings through love, loss, pain, healing and resilience. The collection takes you through the life story of the author while offering advice, notes, and affirmations, which were written to empower the author during difficult times. Walk With Wings tells the story of Tene falling in love, making bad decisions, learning from her mistakes, and discovering how to love her life and herself.

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What are your plans for this weekend? Any trips planned or is it dedicated to catching up with work?

Let’s Hope for the Best, by Carolina Setterwall, 2019

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Title: Let’s Hope for the Best

Author: Carolina Setterwall

Translated by: Elizabeth Clark Wessel

Publisher: Bloomsbury

Genre: Autobiography

Format: Paperback

Language: Original Swedish, translated to English

No. of pages: 400

Synopsis:

One day while nursing her young son, Carolina receives a strange email from her boyfriend Aksel, detailing computer passwords and other instructions in event of his death. She grows worried at first, then irritated – this is so typical of her unsentimental partner. Aksel ends the message: Let’s hope for the best! Five months later, he is dead. 
In her debut novel, Let’s Hope for the Best, Carolina Setterwall recounts the intensity of falling in love with her partner Aksel, and the shock of finding him dead in bed one morning. Carolina and Aksel meet at a party, and their passionate first encounter leads to months of courtship during which Carolina struggles to find her place. While Aksel prefers to take things slow, Carolina is eager to advance their relationship -moving in together, getting a cat, and finally having a child.

Perhaps to impose some order on the chaos, Carolina devotedly chronicles the months after Aksel’s passing like a ship’s log. She unpacks with forensic intensity the small details of life before tragedy, eager to find some explanation for the bad hand she’s been dealt. When new romance rushes in, Carolina finds herself assuming the reticent role Aksel once played. She’s been given the gift of love again. But can she make it work?

A striking feat of auto-fiction, written in direct address to Setterwall’s late partner, LET’S HOPE FOR THE BEST is a stylistic tour-de force..

My review:

I received an unsolicited ARC from the publishers in return for an honest review. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.

When I was done reading this book I was so conflicted because how do I dare to review a book with a strong autobiographical theme? How do I dare to judge such a raw telling of the events that can break anyone? How do I judge a story, one which is so real and while it touched me so deeply, I can only imagine how hard it must have been for the people affected by this death?

But I told myself, I have read and studied various critical works like New Criticism, The Intentional Fallacy, Death of an Author, What is an Author etc. And as such I decided to write my review in middle ground.

At first glance, reading the synopsis made me realize that it was not going to be an easy read. And it was true. I took almost a week to read this one because I just could not bear to read it at one go, the way I do with most other books (also the fact that I was travelling played a major factor in this). I could only read this book in spurts because the emotions were too much to deal with. i was experiencing these second hand, mind you, but the writer was writing about real events. I cannot imagine how hard it must have been. The various rounds of edits etc that are to be done after writing the manuscript is another ordeal that I wondered how the author felt about. This book made me realize how very lucky I am today – I know it sounds so bad to someone who has lost a dear one – but it made me appreciate my family more, despite all the quarrels we have. I had to stop reading, go, and hug my mom and dad and my brother too.

This is truly a tour de force. In most translated works, the essence is lost but it si not so. The translator Elizabeth Clark Wessel has done an amazing job. The writing is in present continuous and I like it in autobiographies, I admit. The writing is poignant and raw – you feel so many emotions that sometimes you just have to sit back and let it all sink in. I cried and laughed along with the author. One thing that I liked best was that it is so real – you will love Carolina and hate her at times, even – while you realize that we all do the same things sometimes. We are humans and we are loving, kind and warm. But we are also cruel, selfish and angry at times, lashing out at the ones we love.

Aksel’s death and the aftermath make us question so many thing we do, so many people and things we take for granted. The way Carolina starts to resemble Aksel in her relationship is so parallel and well juxtaposed. The writing has not been sugarcoated and so you see the real aspects of life after the loss of a loved one. I loved the book – it was such a tumultuous ride.

Verdict:

I rate this a solid 5/5 stars. Will probably come back to it again.

About the reviewer:

Nayanika Saikia, is one of the foremost book reviewers from the North-east and Assam, and is also an admin for the official India bookstagram page on Instagram. She publishes her own reviews and recommendations for poetry, fiction, non-fiction etc. on her bookstagram account @pretty_little_bibliophile which won the NorthEast Creator Awards 2018, as well as in daily newspapers, online magazines etc.  She can be contacted at nayanikasaikia98@gmail.com .

What Mina Did, by Geeta Menon, 2019

Title: What Mina Did

Author: Geeta Menon

Publisher: Rupa Publications

Genre: Contemporary

Format: Paperback

Language: English

No. of pages: 250

Synopsis:

A single betrayal can cost you everything…

1998. Twenty-two-year-old Mina is moving to the US from Bangalore to begin a new life with her
husband. Then there’s a horrific murder and her life is turned upside down. Mina’s best friend Neelu helps her out of the abyss. Mina gradually leaves her past behind and settles into a new life in the US.

Years later, she is forced to return to India and is confronted by the demons from her past. In her fragile mental state, she is unable to support Neelu in her time of need. Their friendship hits rock bottom.
Mina goes back to the US and faces further hurdles, this time on the work front. She tries to make
amends with Neelu, but their friendship ends with Neelu accusing Mina of something unimaginable related to the murder. Something, that deep down, Mina knows is true…
Will Mina redeem herself? Will the people she loves forgive her for what she did?
Alternating between flashbacks and the present day, What Mina Did explores how one betrayal
can have catastrophic consequences, while delving into the complex bonds that link mothers and
daughters, and best friends.

My review:

I received a review copy from the publishers in return for an honest review. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.

From the title of the book, I was very sure that it was pure thriller/crime but WHAT MINA DID is much more than that. On the surface, it deals with various aspects of one’s life – like familial, personal, friendships we maintain etc.

One of the main issues we see Mina working through is the aftermath of losing one of the most important figures of her life. Knowing that your closed one has been murdered is never easy to move on from and I am saying this from personal experience. The trauma revolving around that one incident often puts a full stop in the lives of the relatives and others affected from it. moving on seems impossible and for a long time afterwards, these people’ lives revolve around that one trauma only. This trauma forms a significant reason why Mina dos things she does and the way she does. Sometimes, it is easy to blame her for the fall out with Neelu, but on a deeper level, how can she possibly help someone else when she needs great help herself? The characterization was good and the development of Mina’s character was slow yet steadily built.

This book throws light on various issues such as anxiety, dealing with one’s own demons, mental health, with shades of patriarchy, racism etc. The social issues as well as the expectations on women regarding marriage are on point. The narrative is compelling and makes the book an emotional read that I thoroughly enjoyed. Although the beginning is a bit slow paced, the story makes up for it. I liked that the author makes it so easy to empathize with the character. The separation of the story with regards to temporal context was a great addition. However, at times I did feel that the author has generalized a lot of the issues we Indians have to deal with, as well as the cultural and traditional variations. The cover is also intriguing and suits the theme of the book I feel.  

Verdict:

It was an enjoyable read and I rated it a 3.75/5 stars.

About the reviewer: Nayanika Saikia, is one of the foremost book reviewers from the North-east and Assam, and is also an admin for the official India bookstagram page on Instagram. She publishes her own reviews and recommendations for poetry, fiction, non-fiction etc. on her bookstagram account @pretty_little_bibliophile which won the NorthEast Creator Awards 2018, as well as in daily newspapers, online magazines etc.  She can be contacted at nayanikasaikia98@gmail.com .

Shadows of the Night, by Priyanka Lal, 2019

Title: Shadows of the Night

Author: Priyanka Lal

Publisher: Redgrab Books & Anybook

Genre: Short stories

Format: Paperback

Language:  English

No. of pages: 160

Recommended for: YA and above

My review:

Shadows of the Night is a collection of short stories by Priyanka Lal, all of which has been inspired by someone or the other in the author’s life.

The stories are:

  1. Love at Sixteen
  2. The Goan Chase
  3. Twist of Fate
  4. Shadows of the Night
  5. Two can Play
  6. Things…. That Happen by Chance
  7. Celebration of Loss
  8. Language of Love
  9. Wishes and Sighs
  10. Life is to Live
  11. Death do us Part
  12. The Last Wish and a New Beginning
  13. Does Love Last Forever

The stories are a wild collection of horror, romance, first-love, new beginnings, human resilience etc. I really enjoyed reading them all but the first one was definitely my favourite.

The language used is very simple so even beginners can read it. The narration was easy-going as well. I could not put the book down once I started reading honestly.

However, the editing can be worked on. As well as the book cover, for I do not think this cover did the book justice.

Verdict:

It was an enjoyable overall read. I rate it a 3/5 stars.

About the reviewer:

Nayanika Saikia, is one of the foremost book reviewers from the North-east and Assam, and is also an admin for the official India bookstagram page on Instagram. She publishes her own reviews and recommendations for poetry, fiction, non-fiction etc. on her bookstagram account @pretty_little_bibliophile which won the NorthEast Creator Awards 2018, as well as in daily newspapers, online magazines etc.  She can be contacted at nayanikasaikia98@gmail.com .

Kaalkoot: The Lost Himalayan Secret, by S. Venkatesh, 2018

Title: Kaalkoot

Author: S. Venkatesh

Publisher: TreeShade Books

Genre: Sci-fi, Adventure

Format: Paperback

Language: English

No. of pages: 343

Recommended for: Ages 13 and up!

Synopsis:

January 1944 
Holed up in a Himalayan hideout, freedom fighter Manohar Rai has to take a chilling decision – one that could mean life or death for millions of people. His only hope is a mysterious young man, who goes into hiding hours before Manohar is shot dead in cold blood. 

June 2018 
A forgotten legend from the upper reaches of the Himalayas is rearing its ominous head. 
The world will be brought to its knees. KaalKoot will strike again. 
Only three people have a clue about the horrors that are about the unfold. The only hope for survival lies buried deep in the remotest corner of Himalayas. But a terrible fate awaits those who seek it. 
Is it already too late Is KaalKoot – the primordial plague – unstoppable?

My review:

I got the book as a part of the review program in Outset https://rakhijayashankar.blogspot.in

A sci-fi mixed with mythology and adventure – Kaalkoot was a perfect read for the cool nights to curl up with. Reading this book was an amazing experience and I absolutely loved every minute of the ride.

Firstly, being divided into the different parts proved invaluable in giving the reader a view into the minds of the different characters of the story. While Sameer may be the conventional protagonist, each of the characters made by the author were real in their own terms with various layers to their being. Thus in terms of character development, the author has excelled by far and beyond, for each one was round and whole.

The plot was unpredictable and one couldn’t think up on what happened next. The author continued taking the reader on the twists and turns and they were mind blowing. I have to say that the author did a really good job in keeping at least me, if not undoubtedly many more readers as well, hooked on until the very end.

The themes of deceit, the nature of man, good versus evil, are all undoubtedly very common but the author has given a twist on them, thus making the narrative very interesting. The inclusion of mythology mixed with science is also again, very innovative and made everything so much more real. Most importantly, the author made sure that all of these would remain and haunt the readers’ minds even after finishing the book.

The adventure aspect of this also was very well-written. The scenes which were worth all the nail-biting the reader goes through, are really well-planned and executed to perfection.

Verdict:

I really enjoyed this book and rate it a 4.5/5 stars. I believe that if you are fan of Dan Brown or Jeffrey Archer or Robert Galbraith, this book might also help you widen your scopes in the genre in India.

About the reviewer:

Nayanika Saikia, is one of the foremost book reviewers from the North-east and Assam, and is also an admin for the official India bookstagram page on Instagram. She publishes her own reviews and recommendations for poetry, fiction, non-fiction etc. on her bookstagram account @pretty_little_bibliophile which won the NorthEast Creator Awards 2018, as well as in daily newspapers, online magazines etc.  She can be contacted at nayanikasaikia98@gmail.com .

February 2019 TBR part 1!

It’s time I showed you all my #februarytbr , the #part1 . Yes I plan on reading a ton of books this month so let’s see how I do.

1. Kaalkoot by @authorsvenkatesh
I’m already done with this book so the review will be up soon!
2. Shadows of the Night by Priyanka Lal
3. Scammed by @ahmedf45
4. The Perfect Drug by @chaitanya424
I’m currently reading this book
5. Between You and Me by @societalmoksha @bloomsburyindia
6. The Anonymous by @nidhikkukreja
I’m already done with this book so the review will be up soon!
7. Krishantak by Anuj Singh Nagaur
8. Wake Up, Girl! By @niharikatheauthor @bloomsburyindia
I’m also done with this book and the review will be up after 2 days!
9. The Lupanarium by @authoradeleleigh
I’m also done with this book and i wrote a really long review about it and l share it soon!
10. The Stalker by @sandeeplochansharma
11. Honey and the Moon by Kamini Kusum
12. Until Love Sets us Apart by @adityanighhot .
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#qotd : so do you have any favourite festival? And I’m talking about the non major ones (so you cannot answer with Durga Puja, Ganesha chaturthi, pongal or such!) OR are you excited for Saraswati Puja tomorrow?

January 2019 Wrap-up!

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It’s kind of cold today again and just when I thought that I’d forego the coat, I had to actually wear it again today!
Nonetheless, a happy Friday to you all!! Today I’m showing you all my #januarywrapup when I read a total of 13 books. I’m hoping to read the same number this month, more work less.
So the books I read in January are:
1. The Matchmaker’s List by @saskinthecity thanks @berkleypub #partner (click here to see the review)
2. The Peshwa II: War of the Deceivers by @sivasankaranram @westland_books (click here to see the review)
3. The Guarded Heart by Robyn Donald
4. It’s Official Stupid by @siddbaliga (click here to see the review)
5. Bestseller by @ahmedf45 (click here to see the review)
@rupa_publications
6. The new Dewtas by @surajtheauthor (click here to see the review)
7. Scrapbook of n Unfound Songstress by @unfoundsongstress (click here to see the review)
8. Shadow and Bone by @lbardugo which I buddy read with @fannatality . It was also for the #readyoshelf challenge by @per_fictionist
(click here to see the review)
9. The Knife Slipped by Erle Stanley Gardner @bloomsburyindia
(click here to see the review)
10. Bride, Bought and Paid for by Helen Bianchin
11. Evil Under the Sun by Agatha Christie @harpercollinsin for the #readyoshelf challenge by @per_fictionist (click here to see the review)
12. Dark Tales by Shirley Jackson @penguinclassics
@penguinrandomhouse (click here to see the review)
13. Burhi Aair Sadhu, a book in assamese for the #readyourchallenge !

#newbooks #indiabookstagram #guwahatiblogger #guwahatibookstagrammers #assambookstagrammers #assamreads #bookpile #aestheticphotos #booksflatlay #prettyfeed #warmfeed #historicalfiction #adventure #bittersweet #indianenglishliterature

January 2019 book haul part 2!


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Hey guys!
I’m back with #part2 of my #januarybookhaul ! I had got a total of 18 new books! And here are the rest!
1. Between You and Me by @societalmoksha @bloomsburyindia
2. A collection of stories in Assamese borrowed from my aunt. Im reading this book as apart of my #readyourmothertongue challenge.
For college:
3. A critical study of #kanthapura by #rajarao which I bought for my Indian English Literature class
4. A book on Literary Criticism
5. Aristotle’s Poetics
6. Classical Literary Criticism @oxfordbookstores
7. Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier @viragopress
8. A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
9. The Invisible Man by H. G. Wells @maplepressofficial which I won in their #giveaway
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#qotd : what series are you currently watching? Are you loving it?

January 2019 book haul part 1!


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Hey guys!
How has the week been treating you so far?
I have been at a seminar since tuesday and have been enjoying listening to the various papers presented. I’ve had an amazing time here at #elysian19 a national students’ seminar held at the Cotton University!
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Anyway, I am back with another #bookhaul ! So for January 2019, I got a total of 18 new books! #januarybookhaul #part1
Some of them are as follows:
1. Kalkoot by @venkatesh.kalaga
2. Krishantak
3. Wake Up, Girl by @niharikatheauthor
4. The Lupanarium by @authoradeleleigh
5. Honey and the moon by K Kusum
6. Scammed by @ahmedf45
7. Until Love Sets us Apart by @adityanighhot given as a gift by @pen_paper_tales
8. Shadows of the Night by Priyanka All
9. The Stalker by Sandeep Sharma
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#qotd : how many books did you get in January?
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#newbooks #indiabookstagram #guwahatiblogger #guwahatibookstagrammers #assambookstagrammers #assamreads #bookpile #aestheticphotos #booksflatlay #prettyfeed #warmfeed #historicalfiction #adventure #bittersweet #indianenglishliterature

First Came Forever (The Angelheart Saga I), Annie Woods, 2017


Title: First Came Forever (The Angelheart Sage I)
Author: Annie Woods
Publisher: Pegasus Elliot Mackenzie Publishers
Format: Paperback
Language: English
Pages: 322
Synopsis:
First love. A promise of forever. A lie that changes everything.
Backpacking with her high school friends, Erica Lindell’s life takes a thrilling new turn. Meeting the fascinating Sasha Ailes, she can’t help but fall completely and irrevocably in love with him. When he feels the same way about her, Erica finds herself drawn into a fairytale love story that will set her life on a new direction. But Sasha has kept his true identity a secret. Finding out who he really is, Erica must overcome the betrayal and make the hardest choice of her life. Can she give up her own dreams to live in his world, or leave and lose him forever?
First Came Forever is an enchanting, heart-wrenching story about finding true love and the devastating consequences it can lead to. What price is too high to pay, even for love?
My review:
Before I begin the actual review, let me state how much time it took me to literally finish reading the book – a day! And no, not even 24 hours; not even half of that. It took me around 4 hours! Once I started with it, I could not ear to keep it down!
First Came Forever was a hauntingly beautiful contemporary story – and that is not a word I generally use for contemporary novels. It has the perfect amount of seasonings of drama, romance, high school romance, and comes with the best imaginable Prince a girl could ever wish for.
One must assume that for a reader to not be able to put down a book, the beginning must be great! And it is. The early chapters are a treat for those who love to travel – it certainly was for me. The writing is so visual – the imagery vivid and so real. Our protagonists are also two very mature persons and I really like that. Especially considering the female protagonist Erica, she is not the damsel-in-distress; completely the opposite in fact. Their relationship is also basically a trope of the older guy-younger girl that I really love.
The family dynamics as well as the friendships are well explored here- the author has brought in a lot of variety. the relationships were also well explored – here again, the fact that the author has made it as realistic as possible without being cheesy and common, is what tends to grip the readers’ minds undoubtedly. Long distance relations, the problems that come with it, the good and the bad times, and the fact that it is not always a walk in the park is well portrayed.
Despite the fact that most of the story takes place in the high-school setting, the author has been successfully able to keep it realistic but also positive. Of course there is the obnoxious head cheerleader, along with the jocks. But they are not all shown as such. We see Tyler with his inner conflicted and vulnerable self, Miriam with her instability, the twins with their adorable-ness, as well as Danny, Ricky, Jordan with their complicated selves- the masks people wear as opposed to the actual selves that they hide… This book is a contemporary treat.
The character development was on point as you may have already learnt by now, reading the review. The plot was also well paced and interesting enough to make me finish this humongous book in literally one sitting. The writing style along with the world building blew my mind away. I definitely will be picking this up for a reread.
Verdict:
I quite enjoyed this book and it was not even a minute before I immediately picked up the sequel after finishing it. I rate this a 4.5/5 stars.

2 Day Down, Dr. Nikita Lalwani, 2018

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Title: 2 Day Down
Author: Dr. Nikita Lalwani
Publisher: Redgrab Books & Anybooks
Format: Paperback
Language: English
Pages: 192
 
Synopsis:
2-day-down is a compilation of stories of 5 women from different walks of life. Each story digs into one of the five period related problems: Pain | Staining | Sexual Inhibition | PMS | Taboo, through each one’s journey. The title signifies the second day of a woman’s period, which is said to be the toughest of the five days. The stories are a reflection of the less acknowledged society around us. Through menstrual problems as a window, the book is an attempt to bring light to the intriguing yet briefly understood aspects of womanhood in different age groups.
 
My review:
With a well-planned story structure, 2 Day Down was a good read and something that I found was truly unique. The entire collection, as divided into 5 different stories on 5 different women proved to be a really good technique as it really separated out the different stories, while also laying them side by side, parallel to each other to compare and contrast them.
The stories individually however could have seen more development in terms of plot and character. I feel that the stories were not very well-paced or very lucid and coherent. It was not very easy to understand at some points.
In terms of the title, the subtitle to be specific, I did not see much of the ‘freedom’ aspect as written. Nonetheless, the author has really shed significant light on women health issues, especially pertaining to periods that are not very well known. In that effect, it proved quite enlightening. In this way, I think this book is perfect when it comes to gaining consciousness and awareness about women especially in regards to their monthly ‘womanly problems’. The society has reached a point where it is ready enough to acknowledge and pay attention to these issues and not just disregard them as something very frugal. The ways in which these stories are presented are also significant as they have been heavily influenced by a very realistic tone.
Overall a very much enjoyable and at times, a bit depressing (because of its realistic portrayal of these women)
 
Verdict:
I enjoyed this book and I rate it a 3.5/5 stars.