Tag Archives: crime

Mehboob Murderer, by Nupur Anand, 2019

Title: Mehboob Murderer

Author: Nupur Anand

Publisher: Om Books International

Published on: 16th March 2019

Genre: Crime thriller/ adult fiction

Format: Paperback

Language: English

No. of pages: 282

Synopsis:

On a rainy September night, six people are gunned down mercilessly in an old Parsi cafe in Mumbai. The mass murder at Cafe Mehboob, located barely a few hundred meters from the police station, and right next to one of the busiest railway stations in Mumbai, jolts the city out of its complacence. The media immediately swings into action, while political pressure mounts on the police force to nab the murderer.

With everyone eager to place the blame of the murders on a madman in a bid to have the case dismissed swiftly, the headstrong inspector Intekhaab Abbas is determined to get to the bottom of the murders. On probing the lives of the victims, he stumbles upon a heady cocktail of love, lust, jealousy, betrayal, rage, longing, misery and ecstasy.

Mehboob Murderer, Nupur Anand’s debut novel, unravels a stunning truth neither the police nor the reader is prepared for.

My review:

I received a review copy from the author in return for an honest review. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.

Mehboob Murderer was an exhilarating read. With a deadline looming over us all, the thriller goes on a pace, which seems nail-bitingly slow and yet we keep at the edge of our seats, expecting some revelation to jump up at us suddenly from around the corner.

Through the various characters that the author introduces to us, she also points out many issues and situations that prevail in the society – which are not necessarily good but rather, inhumane and evil.

Natasha seems like the perfect career-woman who has it all – she is successful and single and happy. However, after the mass murder as the police delve into the lives of all these people, we find murky realities behind them all. Natasha’s past throws light on abuse in a relationship – physical, mental and also sexual. The patriarchal expectations and such, set upon her by Aneesh were also disgusting. Moreover, the embezzling of her personal funds further degrade the personality of Aneesh and forms himself as the lowest of the scum.  

Alam is no better than Aneesh. Sexual harassment, rape and molestation also occurs within the home itself and the author has brought in this through the back story of Alam. How someone can abuse the women and children within their own family is stupefying to believe really.

 Mental health is another theme that the writer brings in through Sujata and her needs. Vikram has a creative streak in him that really helps and adds some joy and lightness to this otherwise heavy read.

Again, the story of a father whose daughter has been raped and then murdered is a cruel one and we see an old yet probably determined Praveen Bharadwaj. Then again, the realization of parents that their kids are not really kids anymore and have a secret and private life of their own is a bit heartbreaking.

The flesh trade or rather, prostitution is the oldest job in the world and we see the fate of a pair of brother and sister as it takes over their lives and they let it – because there is no other way in which they can possibly otherwise make enough money.

It is a heartbreaking novel for sure; as we read through and find out more about all the people murdered in the mass murder at Mehboob Café, we see different phases of life that different people face.

I love how the author has brought in so many aspects of society through all these different people and then tied them together in unity in a story of madness and rage and revenge. I did not at all expect the murderer to be who he was. Not even for a moment did I think that it could have been him. Kudos to the author for being able to keep the identity of the murderer under wraps, until the very end when she reveals it amidst one last drink all the police men have.  The characterization of the city Mumbai is also on point. With a simple and lucid writing style, and that dramatic ending, I think the book was awesome.

Verdict:

I rate this book a 4/5 stars. I really enjoyed it and I hope to pick up more of the author’s books.  

About the reviewer:

Nayanika Saikia, is one of the foremost book reviewers from the North-east and Assam, and is also an admin for the official India bookstagram page on Instagram. She publishes her own reviews and recommendations for poetry, fiction, non-fiction etc. on her bookstagram account @pretty_little_bibliophile which won the NorthEast Creator Awards 2018, as well as in daily newspapers, online magazines etc.  She can be contacted at nayanikasaikia98@gmail.com .

The Voice of Silence, by Rishaj Dubey, 2019

Title: The Voice of Silence

Author: Rishaj Dubey

Publisher: NotionPress

Genre: Contemporary/New Adult/Mental Health

Format: Paperback

Language: English

No. of pages: 284

Synopsis:

“Bestselling author and a ‘diagnosed psychopath’ Aarav Roy has gone missing”
Four years ago.
Aarav is not a normal college kid. From a blurry, abusive childhood, to his severe anxiety and the horrible voices in his head, he is fed up with life. Driven by the belief that his past is everything that defines him, he ended up posting his suicide note online. But, the kind of silence he fantasized never came true. Nikita, who suffered from PTSD and depression, sees her own tragic secrets reflected in him, and she is not going to let the past repeat itself—no matter the cost.
Where is the controversial writer? Who is she? Who does she remind Aarav so much of?
What are the voices in his head? And how much hate can love fuel?
In his debut novel, Rishaj Dubey explores the depths of trauma, corruption, loneliness and what is it like to suffocate in your own breath. 

My review:

I received a review copy from the author in return for an honest review. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.

One of the books I read recently was The Voice of Silence and it was quite a surprising read. The beginning was a bit slow for my taste, but overall, it was a great build-up. Covering a myriad of human emotions, The Voice of Silence in a book that is necessary for us to read because of the important topic that the author has chosen.

The entire story felt like an interior monologue of Aarav and his story with relation to Nikita is gradual and very realistic. The book is a lot about mental health and reading such a book in the Indian context is great, and definitely a first for me. Trigger warning for PTSD, Dissociative Identity Disorder etc. This aspect of the human mind or psychology was a bonus and I found it refreshing to read about in the Indian context.

I think that the characterization is also on point – be it Aarav, Nikita and also Ashish, who is Aarav’s best friend. Their character arcs have developed throughout and it makes for real fleshed out characters.

The author has adopted a simple and easy to understand language, which is relatable and most importantly, very realistic. The way the narrative has been split, with breaks at suitable points, and the addition of the various quotes at the beginning of each chapter was also great. The author has also employed a sort of stream of consciousness method; it is non-linear and jumps back and forth across time.

However, it rather has a complex plot so it might get a bit too heavy at times, but it is an overall great read.

Verdict:

If you love reading psychological thrillers and also books on mental health, this might be the one for you. It is not like every other love story that floods our literature. It is very different from them all and I definitely recommend it. I rate it a 3.5/5 stars!

About the reviewer:

Nayanika Saikia, is one of the foremost book reviewers from the North-east and Assam, and is also an admin for the official India bookstagram page on Instagram. She publishes her own reviews and recommendations for poetry, fiction, non-fiction etc. on her bookstagram account @pretty_little_bibliophile which won the NorthEast Creator Awards 2018, as well as in daily newspapers, online magazines etc.  She can be contacted at nayanikasaikia98@gmail.com .

Fireside Chat with a Grammar Nazi Serial Killer, by Ryan Suvaal, 2019

Title: Fireside Chat with a Grammar Nazi Serial Killer

Author: Ryan Suvaal

Publisher: Self-published

Genre: Thriller/Psychological/novella

Format: E-Book

Language: English

No. of pages: 23

Recommended for: All psychological thriller buffs can go for this short novella.

Synopsis:

Seventeen gruesome killings across the United States, within a span of six months and there is one clear connection among victims. They were all writers. 
While media is decorating the murders with sensationalist stories, and law enforcement is playing catch-up, the homicidal maniac remains elusive and secretive. 
Things get very interesting, when one day she decides to appear on an internet talk show for an honest fireside chat. 

My review:

For such a short psychological thriller, this book was surely a page-turner. Despite its short length it is amazingly fantastic.

The idea that the author has taken up, is in itself very intriguing – for a person to turn a killer because of reading book which lacks the proper grammar! This idea itself of a ‘Grammar Nazi’ being a serial killer is enough to make you take a second look at the book.

What is also great is that this book seems like an aftermath of the killings, when the killer reveals what she does and why she does it. In this way, she too reveals information of the host of the show – which mind you, no one has been able to do so. In one way you cannot help but admire the acumen of this infamous lady killer. She is precise and definitely knows what she is doing – she knows her abilities and uses them to the full of her capability. The author has really carved out a character who seems very real – almost ass if she is one among us. The book reads smoothly as well. It genuinely feels like you’re listening to this show and not merely reading this in a book.


The pacing was kept on-point and the author has done a great job with this seemingly short read. The research shows through. The subtle imagery was also on point! With an amazing surprise at the end, this book comes like a punch, one that you can completely read through easily, under an hour. And a shout out to the author for the blatant message – readers absolutely do not enjoy reading books which have a ton of grammatical errors!

Verdict:

I really enjoyed reading this book and I rate it a 4/5 stars. Definitely recommend it to all crime buffs!

About the author:

Ryan Suvaal is passionate about writing page-turner psychological thrillers. His favorite hangout is a coffee shop where he guzzles in tonnes of caffeine and weaves characters pumped up with deadly intentions and worlds full of thrill, suspense, and gore.
“Fireside Chat with a Grammar Nazi Serial Killer” is one of the first in a series of Psychological thrillers which he has penned down during past few months, which will now be sequentially released on Amazon.

“A deep-rooted question always keeps broiling inside of me. This question is whether I am writing the story or the story is forcing me to write it? Am I the actor and story is the art, or story is the actor and I am the medium?”

About the reviewer:

Nayanika Saikia, is one of the foremost book reviewers from the North-east and Assam, and is also an admin for the official India bookstagram page on Instagram. She publishes her own reviews and recommendations for poetry, fiction, non-fiction etc. on her bookstagram account @pretty_little_bibliophile which won the NorthEast Creator Awards 2018, as well as in daily newspapers, online magazines etc.  She can be contacted at nayanikasaikia98@gmail.com .

Evil Under the Sun, by Agatha Christie, 1941

Title: Evil Under the Sun

Author: Agatha Christie

Publisher: Harper, an imprint of HarperCollins

Genre: Mystery

Format: Paperback

Language: English

No. of pages: 320

Recommended for: All ages

Synopsis:

Set at the Jolly Roger, a posh vacation resort for the rich and famous on the southern coast of England, Evil Under the Sun is one of Agatha Christie’s most intriguing mysteries. When a gorgeous young bride is brutally strangled to death on the beach, only Hercule Poirot can sift through the secrets that shroud each of the guests and unravel the macabre mystery at this playground by the sea. 

My review:

Any Agatha Christie book, is a treasure for me – I am biased, yes – and especially when it is a Hercule Poirot mystery. I simply adore this amazing Belgian gentleman with his twirling moustache.

I also read this book as a part of the #readyoshelf reading challenge hosted by my dear friend Gayatri (@per_fictionist).

Now having read And Then There Were None, I found the greatest similarity in the setting of the story in an island, but with much more complications. Christies never fails to provide great depth to all of the characters/suspects and just when you think you have figured it out, out comes another unexpected twists that puts the reader’s careful calculation to disarray. Just like every other time I read an Agatha Christie novel, I tried to figure out who the culprit is – even came to a conclusion. But was I right? Nope, never have and I doubt I ever will be when it comes to the Queen on crime mysteries.

There were quite a few modern elements that I saw in this book – the drug syndicate being the major one. Poirot’s mind is truly a jewel and I sometimes wonder what would happen if I placed him and Sherlock Holmes in a room together, locked. Wouldn’t it be absolute fun to see?

Aa usual, there is a murder here, that of the beautiful Arlena Stuart. However, what is significant is that apart from the actual crime etc., Christie always manages to layer manifold stratums of human behaviour and psychology within the plot, the characters and the entire narrative. And that is what perhaps keeps readers hooked on to her book even today.

Verdict:

I really enjoyed this book and I rate it a 4/5 stars.

About the author:

Agatha Christie is the best-selling author of all time. She wrote eighty crime novels and story collections, fourteen plays, and several other books. Her books have sold roughly four billion copies and have been translated into 45 languages. She is the creator of two of the most enduring figures in crime literature-Hercule Poirot and Miss Jane Marple-and author of The Mousetrap, the longest-running play in the history of modern theatre. 

About the reviewer:

Nayanika Saikia, is one of the foremost book reviewers from the North-east and Assam, and is also an admin for the official India bookstagram page on Instagram. She publishes her own reviews and recommendations for poetry, fiction, non-fiction etc. on her bookstagram account @pretty_little_bibliophile which won the NorthEast Creator Awards 2018, as well as in daily newspapers, online magazines etc.  She can be contacted at nayanikasaikia98@gmail.com .

The Woman in the Window, A. J. Finn, 2018

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Publishers: HarperCollins Publishers
Synopsis:
What did she see?
It’s been ten long months since Anna Fox last left her home. Ten months during which she has haunted the rooms of her old New York house like a ghost, lost in her memories, too terrified to step outside.
Anna’s lifeline to the real world is her window, where she sits day after day, watching her neighbours. When the Russells move in, Anna is instantly drawn to them. A picture-perfect family of three, they are an echo of the life that was once hers.
But one evening, a frenzied scream rips across the silence and Anna witnesses something no one was supposed to see. Now she must do everything she can to uncover the truth about what really happened. But even if she does, will anyone believe her? And can she even trust herself?
My review:
The protagonist is almost like an anti-heroine and that’s the one thing that really attracted me- the unreliable narrator aspect is one trope that is very often used in case of women in psychological thrillers. In this novel too, I really like it. Moreover, the fact that she being a psychologist is undergoing a psychological problem herself is quite poignant- though she has been trained to help such children, she is unable to help herself. The agoraphobia theme is also something new that I have come across and in this way definitely learnt something new. Anna Fox is a really likeable character despite her many flaws. She is so realistic and relatable that you just cannot help but almost reach out to her as she despairs her situation and the believability that people have when it comes to her authenticity.
The other characters too I feel were well developed, though none as well as Anna, obviously. The whole story took quite an unexplainable turn in the end as anyone can expect in a novel as such, and yet this twist is completely twisted and not something that one could have even imagined. It’s wilder than wild horses running in your dreams.
The whole book, though seeming quite long, was actually very easy to cover- probably because of the short chapters. The reader is kept reeling as the shocks come, one after the another. However, I have to admit that I found the beginning very slow and I hardly ever favour slow-paced books. I had put down the book I admit, but somehow decided to take it up again because of the fact that I hate to DNF it.
This psychological thriller was really an interesting one for me. Having read The Girl on the Train as well as Gone Girl, I loved this opportunity to be able to read another such exciting and fun read.
Verdict:
This was a 4 star read for me undoubtedly. The one star I do not give- it’s only because of the unsatisfactory and slow paced beginning.